How to Properly Maintain Your Self Propelled Wheelchairs During the Coronavirus Pandemic?

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There’s no doubt that the coronavirus pandemic has put everyone in a disadvantaged position. Businesses and industries are also put to an unnecessary standstill. Thus, the economic slowdown would be inevitable.

But for the disabled people or those with physical infirmities who have their wheelchairs as their constant companion, they are bound to be hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Self propelled wheelchairs need proper care so you can also get the most value from them.

If you are a wheelchair user, we suggest that you consider the following best practices if you want your disability equipment to remain in its top form even during the coronavirus scare.  

Know that these recommendations are in line with what is being suggested also by the CDC. Putting these recommendations into proper practice will mean to say that you can put aside any rule set in place by the state, federal, and local government. All which are aimed towards keeping you safe and sound during this crisis, and after it has come to pass.  

What Do You Need to Have When Cleaning Wheelchairs?

mobility aidThe coronavirus can live on hard surfaces for up to 72 hours. Hence, it is important that you conduct regular cleaning and sanitizing work in your home and office now and then. This way you have the highest assurance that your home, kitchen countertops, and work areas are not just squeaky clean but are also free from the dreaded virus. 

Beyond the regular cleaning work, it is also crucial that you disinfect your wheelchair paying particular attention to those areas that you or your caregiver frequently touch. Such areas have a high risk of contamination not just with the coronavirus, but with microbes and bacteria, too.

But don’t worry, if you properly disinfection those areas, you will be able to exterminate them effectively.  

  • For surfaces sullied by grime, oil, or dirt, washing them with soap and water will help do the trick. Final cleaning work should involve the use of a highly potent disinfectant.  
  • When it comes to disinfectant wipes, veer away from the use of baby wipes. As much as possible, consider the use of wipe products that are EPA-approved and have at least 70% alcohol solution in them.  
  • Should you opt for a disinfectant solution, consider the use of a spray bottle for better coverage. For every quart of water, match it with 4 teaspoons of a bleaching/disinfecting product.  

Do you have a Home Caretaker? 

If you happen to have a home caretaker staying with you inside your house, see to it that they are observing the same precautions that you’re doing. And if you are unable to carry out the cleaning and disinfecting work yourself, make it sure that your home caretaker will help you in doing so. Or delegate the cleaning and disinfecting work to them instead.  

  • See to it that your home caretaker is equipped with hand gloves when cleaning and performing disinfection work. Otherwise, see to it that they are in the habit of washing their hands thoroughly when they are around. 
  • You can delegate to your home caretaker the cleaning work that you require for your wheelchair or any other assistive device that you may be using.  
  • If somebody else needs to assist you in personal care, require them to make use of disposable gloves. Surgical gloves would be most recommended here because they are not just disposable but cheaper, too. Properly dispose of used pairs every time.  
  • Are you catheterizing? See to it that both you and your caregiver would be washing hands thoroughly before and after.  

With or without the COVID-19 pandemic,  keep in mind that how you clean your self propelled wheelchairs or any other disability equipment  or how you maintain them so they remain in tip-top shape will determine the value you’d get from their use.